This page includes resources about power and privilege for journalism educators to incorporate into lesson plans.

Scroll through, explore each heading, click the links, explore the material, use it, and make it your own. Also make sure to check out resources on content collaboration and community dialogues.

CHECKING YOUR PRIVILEGE

This section will help students with dominant identities better understand their own privileges and positions in societal hierarchies. Some students—especially from marginalized and oppressed communities—may want the opportunity to engage in alternative activities or assignments. We recommend offering alternatives based on your own pedagogical style but want to emphasize the need to take it into consideration.

STRUCTURAL RACISM IN JOURNALISM

UNDERMINING STRUCTURAL RACISM IN JOURNALISM

Assignments for all of the Above Sections

UNDERSTANDING ABLEISM IN JOURNALISM

Ableism is a topic that is under-discussed in universities and journalism courses. While words like “crazy” and “insane” are thrown around in the media, they typically obscure what is really being said. For example, it’s more accurate to say a college party that got out of control was “wild” than to say it was “crazy” or “insane.” And while journalism courses often teach students AP Style, the problematic use of these words is rarely taught even though many have entries in the Stylebook.

We recommend consulting scholarship and education directly from members of disabled communities to get a fuller picture of how to approach teaching this subject. And while the AP Stylebook addresses these topics and is an ok place to start, we highly recommend using the National Center on Disability in Journalism as a central source.

LGBTQ+ REPRESENTATION IN JOURNALISM

This section includes a variety of resources and tools for teaching students how to better cover LGBTQ+ communities, events, and issues.

As always, we want to encourage future journalists to become experts, form relationships, and collaborate with the communities they’re covering. This is the first step to building trust with those communities.

CLASS, CAPITAL, AND POWER IN JOURNALISM

It’s important students understand the roles class, capital, and power play in journalism. The roles of money, profit-incentive, corporations, advertisers, and holders of capital on the structures of modern journalism are essential to understanding how journalism functions today. Here we offer some tools for structuring a section on class, capital, and power.